Live Long

Eat well

Move more

Call Us:  304-354-9244

Emergency: Call 911

Your partner in health today, tomorrow, and for life.

PUT YOUR HEART INTO IT!!!

During the month of February, Americans see the human heart as the

symbol of love. February is American Heart Month, a time to show

yourself the love.

According to The American Heart Association®, heart disease is the

leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.

Fortunately, it is largely preventable and there are many things people can do to reduce their risk.

Not sure where to start?  

Start by showing your heart some love today by calling Rebecca Ewing,
Director of

Cardiopulmonary “It is my pleasure to get to know your heart and help you take care of it.”


Click Either logo for more information

Just a few Heart Disease Statistics

General Facts

In 2008, over 616,000 people died of heart disease.
In 2008, heart disease caused almost 25% of deaths—almost one in every four—in the United States.
Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. More than half of the deaths due to heart disease in 2008 were in men.
Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease. In 2008, 405,309 people died from coronary heart disease.
Every year about 785,000 Americans have a first coronary attack. Another 470,000 who have already had one or more coronary attacks have another attack.
In 2010, coronary heart disease alone was projected to cost the United States $108.9 billion. This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.


Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Women and Heart Disease

More than 42 million women are currently living with some form of cardiovascular disease.
More than 8 million women have a history of heart attack and/or angina.
Five and a half million women will suffer angina.
Heart disease is the leading cause of death of American women, killing more than a third of them.
35.3% of deaths in American women over the age of 20, or more than 432,000, are caused by cardiovascular disease each year.
More than 200,000 women die each year from heart attacks- five times as many women as breast cancer.
More than 159,000 women die each year of congestive heart failure, accounting for 56.3% of all heart failure deaths.
48% of adult women have a total cholesterol of at least 200mg/dL.
50% of Caucasian women, 64% of African-American women, 60% of Hispanic women, and 53% of Asian/Pacific Islander women are sedentary and get no leisure time physical activity.
58% of Caucasian women, 80% of African-American women, and 74% Hispanic-American women are overweight or obese.
Women with diabetes are 2.5 times more likely to have heart attacks.
More women than men die of heart disease each year.
23% of women and 18% of men will die within one year of a first recognized heart attack; 22-32% of women and 15-27% of men heart attack survivors will die within five years.
12-25% of women and 7-22% of men heart attack survivors will be diagnosed with heart failure within five years.
Women are less likely than men to receive appropriate treatment after a heart attack.
Women comprise only 27% of participants in all heart-related research studies.
Percent of women 18 years and over who met the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity through leisure-time aerobic activity: 44.6%
Percent of women 18 years and over who currently smoke: 16.5%
Percent of women 18 years and over who had 5 or more drinks in 1 day at least once in the past year: 13.6%
Percent of women 20 years and over who are obese: 35.9% (2007-2010)
Percent of women 20 years and over with hypertension: 32.8% (2007-2010)
Source: WomenHeart and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention



Risk Factors for Heart Disease
Overweight/Obesity


Percent of adults age 20 years and over who are obese: 35.9% (2009-2010)
Percent of adults age 20 years and over who are overweight (and not obese): 33.3% (2009-2010)
Percent of adolescents age 12-19 years who are obese: 18.4% (2009-2010)
Percent of children age 6-11 years who are obese: 18.0% (2009-2010)
Percent of children age 2-5 years who are obese: 12.1% (2009-2010)
In 2008, medical costs associated with obesity were estimated at $147 billion; the medical costs for people who are obese were $1,429 higher than those of normal weight.
Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest age-adjusted rates of obesity (49.5%) compared with Mexican Americans (40.4%), all Hispanics (39.1%) and non-Hispanic whites (34.3%)
Among non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American men, those with higher incomes are more likely to be obese than those with low income.
Higher income women are less likely to be obese than low-income women.
There is no significant relationship between obesity and education among men. Among women, however, there is a trend—those with college degrees are less likely to be obese compared with less educated women.
Between 1988–1994 and 2007–2008 the prevalence of obesity increased in adults at all income and education levels.


Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention